Quote #17 – Augustine

But love is greater gift than knowledge; for whenever a man has the gift of knowledge, love is necessary by the side of it, so that he is not puffed up. For “love does not envy, does not vaunt itself, is not puffed up.” (1 Cor. 13.4)

From: On Grace and Free Will by Augustine, chapter 40

About Me – Calvinism

If you don’t know, this is a post that helps you the reader to become more acquainted with where I – the author of this site – stand on various topics and theological points. Keep reading to see where I stand on today’s topic.


Personally, I don’t like to be associated to the name of a person to describe my views but the term has become common and thus it is used. Even so, I don’t think John Calvin would have been thrilled either.

This website is actually named because of my position in Calvinism. As I have an aversion to using a person’s name, I turn to “monergist” which translates to “one who believes in one work”. “Gratia” of course means grace so taken together we get: “one who believe in the one work of grace”.

I came up with the title as historically there was another famous monergist who sparred with Saint Augustine and that would be Pelagius. In the case of Pelagius, he believe in the one work of man’s will. Still a monergist but definitely not the same sort as myself.

If you want more details about Calvinism, I’ve already written on the topic and you can check out the articles related here.

To be clear, I’m not one of those sort that is going to says something like, “If you’re not a Calvinist, you’re not a Christian!” I don’t agree with that sort of thinking at all!

I would submit that Arminians and others are theologically inconsistent/incorrect/etc. but one’s understanding of Calvinism isn’t absolutely necessary to become a true follower of Christ – that begins simply with what we find in the Gospels. In other words, the tenets of Calvinism aren’t essential for you to understand to come to faith in Christ (despite them being very much involved as you do) though it is inevitable that you’d come to understand the Scriptures involving them as you grow in your faith – whether you come to the same conclusions as Calvinists or not is a different story entirely.

I fully expect to be before Christ one day among those considered Arminian, Pentecostal, Presbyterian, etc. who were true believers in Christ in this life, and I won’t be surprised to hear Christ correcting us all on some point or another.


Note: I do these posts not because I think I’m somehow superior in my views or anything absurd like that but out of a desire to be up-front and honest with my readers as to where I stand. Otherwise, you’d be left to figure things out by reading between the lines and/or guessing.

Greek Word: σταυροω

Today – stauroo

In the Greek: σταυροω

Pronunciation (Erasmian): stow-ro’-oh

Definition/approximate English equivalent: Ι crucify; to crucify, to stake down.

Example of its use:

  • Matthew 20:19 (Tischendorf): καὶ παραδώσουσιν αὐτὸν τοῖς ἔθνεσιν εἰς τὸ ἐμπαῖξαι καὶ μαστιγῶσαι καὶ σταυρῶσαι, καὶ τῇ τρίτῃ ἡμέρᾳ ἐγερθήσεται.

Notes: This word is a verb. In Greek, verb endings change (and sometimes the beginnings too) to fit its use in the sentence. The verb communicates not just its meaning but also person and plurality. Verbs have no tense but they do have aspects. In the above example, we see one of the more unique endings as this is an Aorist Active Infinitive verb form. Think “to” verbs as in “to crucify” rather than “I crucify”. Following with this uniqueness, this form of the verb doesn’t have person or plurality. There is only the action.

There are additional verbs joined to it before joined by the “kai” which often acts like “and”. If you look, you’ll notice they too end in σαι/αι and are also Aorist Active Infinitive (aspect/tense form – voice – mood).

As an additional note: you will find teachers who refer to aspect as “tense form” or even “tense” but they do not mean it in the exact same sense as English tenses – usually. There just isn’t a 1 to 1 equivalence to be found. There are generally two camps, however, among Greek scholars – those who says tenses exist and those who says there’s no such thing, there’s only aspect. Sort of muddies the waters I know but I point this out to help you decipher why different teachers may refer to things differently.

Quote #15 – Waldron & Calvin

This comes from my studies involving John Calvin. Among those studies are two guiding principles used by Calvin and I came across the following summation from my professor (Dr. Waldron) about the honor of Christ that particularly hit me that I will share with you here.

Maintaining the glory of the Lord involves entirely renouncing all glory of our own. This renunciation is in order to give all praise for righteousness to the Lord.

See the Institutes of the Christian Religion at 3:13:3 for the full text this is based

About Me – On Apologetics

If you don’t know, this is a post that helps you the reader to become more acquainted with where I – the author of this site – stand on various topics and theological points. Keep reading to see where I stand on today’s topic.


In Christian Apologetics, there are often two particular angles on “defending the faith” that are taken and those would be presuppositional apologetics and classical apologetics – arguably there are others but I’ll keep it to these two. There are many today who would side quite staunchly with one or the other too. I am not one of those.

I have long since been more of a big-picture sort of thinker and over the course of my life you could have made an argument for my being more closely connected to one type of apologetics over another. Today, I would certainly side most with presuppositional as it more readily takes into account the root assumptions we have in our beliefs – something people of all backgrounds (even non-Christian ones) have. Even so, I’m not against using evidence-based arguments when they make sense to and I’m certainly not against using reason/logic argumentation – I just don’t depend solely on these things.

Despite what others may say for their own views they inevitably have root assumptions too such that if they argue they’re logic/evidence based, they’re more or less like me whether they recognize it or not. They just may tilt much more strongly toward logic/evidence-based arguments.

In the end and in line with my more “big-picture” way of thinking, I take on a larger view of apologetics that, admittedly, favors presuppositional apologetics but not to the point of excluding the methods of other apologetic practices including those found in the classical approach.


Note: I do these posts not because I think I’m somehow superior in my views or anything absurd like that but out of a desire to be up-front and honest with my readers as to where I stand. Otherwise, you’d be left to figure things out by reading between the lines and/or guessing.


Have further questions? Is my answer too vague?

Please comment on the post and I will make an effort to respond in a timely manner!

Greek Word: ημερα

Today – haymera

In the Greek: ημερα

Pronunciation (Erasmian): hay – mehr – ah

Definition/approximate English equivalent: the day, daytime.

Example of its use:

  • Matt. 24:36 (Tischendorf): Περὶ δὲ τῆς ἡμέρας ἐκείνης καὶ ὥρας οὐδεὶς οἶδεν, οὐδὲ οἱ ἄγγελοι τῶν οὐρανῶν οὐδὲ ὁ υἱός, εἰ μὴ ὁ πατὴρ μόνος.

Notes: This word normally has what looks like an apostrophe called a rough breathing mark (which can be seen in the example above) over the η character facing to the right. This is important as this character normally has an “ay” sort of sound but with the breathing mark gives an h sound to the beginning. In fact, this is how the h sound is provided in Greek – through the rough breathing mark.

Quote #13

“The Christian communities had come increasingly to accept a dangerous degree of ‘moral specialization’: one life was left for the ‘perfect’, another for the average Christian. And it was just this widening gulf between an ascetic elite and a passive rank and file which brought the Christianization of the Roman world to a halt.”

Augustine, from Augustine of Hippo: A Biography

Interesting insight. Just emphasizes people’s tendencies then are much as they are now.

Quote #12

The following was quoted during a sermon from one of my own pastors titled “The Effects of Exposition“.

closing our ears to biblically faithful preaching is to cut ourselves off from the means of grace through which we are more conformed to the image of Christ . . . – this is how the Christian is sanctified. It is through the preached Word and it’s exposition.

Pastor Desmond Gilmore

He then goes on to quote James Renihan. In his book “Edification and Beauty” says . . .

In a primitivist religious environment, Scripture must be at the very center of the life of the participants. This is especially true with regard to preaching. It was the great means by which Christ himself ‘may be said to preach . . . when his ministers do it in His name, His stead, or by His authority’. Nehemiah Coxe considered the work of preaching to be the eminent ‘Work and Business of the Pastor’ because “he is to be the mouth of God to the people, to deliver his message from God, and speak to them in his Name’.

James Renihan