Philology

Dictionary.com noun the study of literary texts and of written records, the establishment of their authenti-city and their original form, and the determination of their meaning. (especially in older use) linguistics, especially historical and comparative linguistics. Obsolete. the love of learning and literature. Etymonline.com late 14c., "love of learning," from Latin philologia "love of learning, love of letters, love of study, literary culture," from Greek philologia "love of discussion, learning, and literature; studiousness," from philo- "loving" (see philo-) + logos "word, speech" (see Logos). Meaning "science of language" is first attested 1716 (philologue "linguist" is from 1590s; philologer "linguistic scholar" is from 1650s); this confusing secondary … Continue reading Philology

Parable

Dictionary.com noun 1. a short allegorical story designed to illustrate or teach some truth, religious principle, or moral lesson. 2. a statement or comment that conveys a meaning indirectly by the use of comparison, analogy, or the like. Etymonline.com mid-13c., parabol, modern form from early 14c., "saying or story in which something is expressed in terms … Continue reading Parable

Messiah

Dictionary.com noun the promised and expected deliverer of the Jewish people. Jesus Christ, regarded by Christians as fulfilling this promise and expectation. John 4:25, 26. (usually lowercase) any expected deliverer. (usually lowercase) a zealous leader of some cause or project. (italics) an oratorio (1742) by George Frideric Handel. Etymonline.com c. 1300, Messias, from Late Latin Messias, from Greek Messias, from Aramaic (Semitic) meshiha and Hebrew mashiah "the anointed" (of the Lord), from mashah "anoint." This is the word rendered in Septuagint as Greek Khristos (see Christ). In Old Testament prophetic writing, it was used of an expected deliverer of the Jewish nation. The modern English form … Continue reading Messiah