About Me – On Baptism

If you don’t know, this is a post that helps you the reader to become more acquainted with where I – the author of this site – stand on various topics and theological points. Keep reading to see where I stand on today’s topic.


In short, I am credo-baptist.

This means I see value and biblical support for the baptism of a professing believer in Christ. This does not include the baptism of infants.

I have long since viewed baptism this way and came to it naturally by simply reading the Scriptures. I’ve read and listened to many an argument for infant baptism (paedobaptism) and do not find the arguments convincing. Even my current studies continue to reaffirm what Scripture clearly teaches – credo.

I know there are some dedicated paedobaptists out there who are likely triggered by that last comment but this post isn’t about debating. This is about where I, the author of this site, am at.

I do want to make a distinction though. There’s another practice often associated with infant baptism that is extra-biblical but there’s also nothing truly wrong with it either. That would be baby dedications and these often involve the parents pledging, before the church, to raise their child right before the Lord. This isn’t a necessary practice or even a required one by Scripture but I also see nothing wrong with it.

I bring these dedications up as they are often confused with infant baptism since they are not uncommonly done alongside it.

Infant baptism isn’t the biblical pattern. In addition, the earliest Christians didn’t do this practice and once they did start doing so, they did it based on very different reasoning than what people do today.

FYI: once infant baptism did become a things, not everyone practiced it and they based it upon the thinking of trying to secure the child through the grace imparted through the act. The reasoning simply wasn’t what you typically see today.


Note: I do these posts not because I think I’m somehow superior in my views or anything absurd like that but out of a desire to be up-front and honest with my readers as to where I stand. Otherwise, you’d be left to figure things out by reading between the lines and/or guessing.

Sacraments

Sacraments are a plural item in Christianity as it is a term for multiple activities. Let’s look first at some simple definitions to get started…


Dictionary.com

 1.  Ecclesiastical. a visible sign of an inward grace, especially one of the solemn Christian rites considered to have been instituted by Jesus Christ to symbolize or confer grace: the sacraments of the Protestant churches are baptism and the Lord’s Supper; the sacraments of the Roman Catholic and Greek Orthodox churches are baptism, confirmation, the Eucharist, matrimony, penance, holy orders, and extreme unction.

2. (often initial capital letter). Also called Holy Sacrament. the Eucharist or Lord’s Supper.

Also called Holy Sacrament. the Eucharist or Lord’s Supper
3. the consecrated elements of the Eucharist, especially the bread.
4. something regarded as possessing a sacred character or mysterious significance.
5. a sign, token, or symbol. a sign, token, or symbol.
6. an oath; solemn pledge. an oath; solemn pledge.

Etymonline.com

“outward and visible sign of inward and spiritual grace,” also “the eucharist,” c. 1200, from Old French sacrament “consecration; mystery” (12c., Modern French sacrement) and directly from Latin sacramentum “a consecrating” (also source of Spanish sacramento, German Sakrament, etc.), from sacrare “to consecrate” (see sacred); a Church Latin loan-translation of Greek mysterion (see mystery).

Meaning “a holy mystery” in English is from late 14c. The seven sacraments are baptism, penance, confirmation, holy orders, the Eucharist, matrimony, and anointing of the sick (extreme unction).


Discussion/Explanation

Obviously, there’s a broader context here besides just “certain activities”.

Historically, there have been seven sacraments as mentioned from both dictionary.com and etymonline.com. I think the dictionary.com definition #1 does a particularly nice job in this case as it not only shows what are the sacraments but also points out an important distinction between Protestants and the Roman Catholic/Greek Orthodox churches.

In Protestantism there is baptism and the Lord’s Supper. The Lord’s Supper goes by other names too – namely communion or the Eucharist. If you are not familiar with the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper, it’s practice is tied to Matthew 26:26-29 (as well as parallels in the other gospels). From this has come many practices observed but the common elements are the “bread and wine” – representing the body and the blood of Christ respectively.

Baptism has its variances as well but it still involves belief and water in each instance – whether the water be a sprinkling on the individual or by submersion & whether it’s the belief of the individual vs. the belief of the parents.

Penance, confirmation, holy orders, anointing of the sick (extreme unction) – I don’t intend to treat these here, perhaps in the future, but they are commonly practiced today in the Catholic church as well as others.

Matrimony or marriage is the one I personally find most interesting here. Why? Well, its because of how the Catholic church sees it as a sacrament but Protestantism overall does not. This will be the topic of a future post.

I will end it here. It should be clear what a sacrament is from these definitions as well as what practices are commonly considered sacraments in historic Christendom. As always, you’re welcome back next week where I move onto the next term in the list!


I'm part of Post A Week 2016

Soteriology

The study of salvation or, more specifically, the doctrine of salvation from our sins.

Etymology: (from etymonline)

“1847, in reference to health; 1864 in reference to salvation, from German soteriologie, from Greek soteria “preservation, salvation,” from soizein “save, preserve,” related to sos “safe, healthy,” of uncertain origin (perhaps from PIE root *teue- “to swell”). With -ology.”

Studying salvation helps us to understand our faith more deeply as well as enables us to give an account of it to those outside the faith (aka witnessing).

Key questions discussed in this area of study today include:

Is baptism required for salvation?

What does it mean to be a born-again Christian?

Once saved are you then always saved? (Can you lose your salvation?)

…and more.

It ultimately helps us understand other related doctrines such as redemption, sanctification, justification, propitiation, and substitutionary atonement. Many of these doctrines will appear in later posts.

This should at least give you an idea of what this area of study covers as well as provide you some material to begin digging into the doctrines of salvation.


Until next time!